Taliban negotiators demand Wahhabi laws in Pakistan

Two members of a committee from the TTP -- Maulana Abdul Aziz (R) and Maulana Sami-ul-Haq-- are seen a picture taken in Islamabad on February 3, 2014 .

Two members of a committee from the TTP — Maulana Abdul Aziz (R) and Maulana Sami-ul-Haq– are seen a picture taken in Islamabad on February 3, 2014 .

Negotiators representing Pakistani Taliban say there was no chance of peace in Pakistan until Islamabad embraces Wahhabi laws across the violence-wracked country.

Maulana Abdul Aziz, the chief cleric of Islamabad’s Red Mosque said the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan’s long-held commitment to imposing the strict laws across the violence-wracked was not open to debate.

“The Taliban won’t accept (the talks) even one per cent,” Aziz said on Wednesday.

The TTP-backed cleric also demanded that all Pakistan’s secular courts based on the common law system be abolished.

“I don’t think the government will accept this but they should, because war isn’t the way forward.”

Meanwhile, a senior pro-Taliban cleric has recently accused the Pakistani government of trying to sabotage the ongoing peace process with the militant groups.

Maulana Samiul Haq, the chief of a faction of Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam party said Islamabad has secretly been preparing to launch an all-out military operation against the TTP and its affiliate factions.

The remarks come as talks between government negotiators and representatives from the Pakistani pro-Taliban leaders have been delayed. The talks are aimed at ending years of fighting in the northwestern region.

In a rare address to the parliament, Sharif has said “terrorism” must be defeated, either by talks or force, and he was giving peace a last chance.

Premier Sharif has been an advocate of peace talks with the pro-Taliban militants since his election campaign, which ended in his May victory.

However, senior civilian and military officials have repeatedly said militants cannot “coerce” Islamabad into accepting their terms in the government-initiated peace process.

The militants are highly active in Pakistan’s tribal regions, which border neighboring Afghanistan. They want to overthrow the state institutions and impose Wahhabi laws across the militancy-riddled country.[More]