More Israel disclosures in Snowden’s trove of ‘significant stories’ – Greenwald

Published time: January 07, 2014 10:52

Combo of file pictures shows US journalist Glenn Greenwald (L, October 9, 2013 in Brasilia) and US whistleblower Edward Snowden (R, still frame grab recorded on June 6, 2013 in Hong Kong and released to AFP on June 10, 2013). (AFP Photo / Evaristo Sa / The Guardian)

Combo of file pictures shows US journalist Glenn Greenwald (L, October 9, 2013 in Brasilia) and US whistleblower Edward Snowden (R, still frame grab recorded on June 6, 2013 in Hong Kong and released to AFP on June 10, 2013). (AFP Photo / Evaristo Sa / The Guardian)

Glenn Greenwald, the investigative journalist who first published Edward Snowden leaks, said that the NSA whistleblower still has “a huge number of very significant stories to reveal,” including those relating to Israel.

“There definitely are stories left that involve the Middle East, that involve Israel. The reporting is going to continue at roughly the same pace that has been happening,” the former Guardian journalist said in an interview with Channel 10 television station that aired Monday night.

“I don’t want to preview any stories that aren’t yet published, but it’s definitely the case that there are a huge number of very significant stories that are left to report,” the Brazil-based Greenwald said, adding that the journalists will continue releasing stories “at roughly the same pace that has been happening.”

“We have only had these documents for seven months, which, given their volume and complexity, is not a very long time,” he noted.

Documents leaked in December by former NSA contractor, Edward Snowden, revealed that the US National Security Agency worked hand in hand with the UK’s GCHQ to target email addresses belonging to the then-serving Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Defense Minister Ehud Barak, among others. According to an exclusive report by the Israeli news agency, Debka, specializing in intelligence and security news, after 2009 Washington introduced “a high-powered, multilayered system of intelligence-gathering” – especially against Israel, about which neither Snowden nor the Israelis have been forthcoming. This system, the agency claimed, had a “single narrow focus: to pick up the slightest murmur or clue suggesting that Israel was about to launch an attack on Iran’s nuclear sites, which it had threatened to do without prior notice to Washington.”

“Listening in on the laconic conversations Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu held with Ehud Barak was not enough. What the spies were told to look for was out-of-the-way conduct, such as an order placed suddenly for a large quantity of aircraft fuel, or the import of an unusual amount of emergency medical equipment,” Debka’s report concluded.

 

The Israeli Parliament (Photo by James Emery / flickr.com)

The Israeli Parliament (Photo by James Emery / flickr.com)

The NSA responded to media reports claiming it had spied on top Israeli brass by saying that it is “not going to comment publicly on every specific alleged intelligence activity,” while NSA spokeswoman, Bernadette Meehan, added that the US “gathers foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations.”